Showing posts with label Tools. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tools. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Bookbinders and Pizza Cutters

I was given this wood engraving of a bookbinder years ago, and always wondered where it was from as it had obviously been removed from a book... In the course of cleaning up, actually took it out of the frame, scanned it, and searched on Google Images using the scan. Great tool for IDing things or at least narrowing them down... In this case, the image was used on several blogs, most not attributing it to anything, including those of special collections type libraries. Alas...

My copy. Where did it come from...?

Image is from the 1824 edition of The Book of English Trades. There were numerous editions of this text with differing illustrations for the trades, and a varying selection of trades. HathiTrust has many of these editions online, and by comparing the image and where it appears was able to conclude it was from the 1824 edition because the image was on the verso facing the text. The 1827 edition has it on the other side... In the 1818 edition a different bookbinder faces the other way.

1824, position and image match my copy.

1827, same image, but on facing page.

1818, different binder facing in opposite direction.
The number of rolls on the rack in the background varies, too.

And, on the subject of racks of rolls, and because it's past lunchtime, here a picture of "pizza cutters" I recently added to my collection...

"Pizza cutters"

Verso of "Pizza cutters"

Lunch...

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Werkzeuge - Tools

Aus dem Buchbinderlehrling, 7 Jg., 1937 – Werkzeugkästen für die Stifte im ersten Lehrjahr, fortgeschrittenere Lehrlinge und Gehilfen, sowie Gesellen und Meister.

 Out of the Buchbinderlehrling, Vol 7, 1937 – Tool sets for apprentices in their first year, more advanced apprentices and unskilled laborers, as well as journeymen and masters.

Stifte im ersten Lehrjahr, Reichsmark 9
For 1st apprentices, 9 Reichsmarks

Für Buchbinderlehrlinge und Gehilfen, Reichsmark 50
For apprentices and "unskilled" laborers, 50 Reichsmarks

Für Gesellen und Meister, Rcichsmark 70
For journeymen and masters, 70 Reichsmarks

Nix für Lehrlinge sondern eher Gesellen und Meister... Ohne Preis.
Nothing for apprentices, but rather journeymen and master... Priceless

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Under Pressure - Unter Druck

Ad for hydraulic Krause presses from Allgemeiner Anzeiger für Buchbindereien, 1899. Even comes with its own narrow-gauge railroad.


Saturday, April 20, 2013

Werbung - "And now a message from our sponsor"

Recently acquired the 1927 issue of the Allegmeiner Anzeiger für Buchbindereien, the leading trade weekly for bookbinders, in part because it is a nice complement (and contrast) to my 1927 copy of the Jahrbuch der Einbandkunst published by the Meister der Einbandkunst. I was also very glad to find numerous articles by Ernst Collin, to whom this blog is dedicated in it (and will shortly be adding to the growing bibliography of his writings I am compiling).

As with all trade publications, there is lots of advertising, so below a selection that spoke to me today...

Gluing out: Before and After


Springback ledger/account books

In honor of the two comets we will have seen this year,
an ad from a brush factory.

A journeyman son of a meister looking to swap positions with a peer.
Experienced in all manner of binding styles and no slouch in gold tooling and blocking.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Aufschabeblech - What would it be called in English?

From Paul Kersten's Die Buchbinderei und das Zeichnen des Buchbinders ... (Halle a.d. Saale, 1909), plate 1.

An odd looking tool with an even odder name in German, aufschabeblech. It's also referred to as a aufschabebrett as it could be made of wood too. In Italian it's sfilacciatoio and in French effileur. Below is a description of how it would have been used. Apparently, there is no English term, or is there? Suggestions?

So, how was this tool used? After sewing on raised or recessed cords, and the spine pasted up, the cords were cut short and pulled through the holes in the blech (tin), untwisted and then frayed out until very fine using the back of a knife. This then allowed them to be pasted out and neatly fanned out on the wastesheet of the textblock or on the top of the board as in the diagram below from Wiese's Werkzeichnen für Buchbinder..., (Stuttgart, 1937).


About this method of board attachment, Ernst Collin wrote in his Pressbengel (translated as The Bone Folder):
BIBLIOPHILE: Master, your logic is impeccable and I will keep what you said in mind. Let me ask you another question. A librarian acquaintance of mine once said that the French do a much better job with their quarter-leather bindings than the Germans.

BOOKBINDER: That is absurd. What is most likely behind that statement is the difference between the French and German styles in how the boards are attached. Remember how I described pasting the frayed-out cords on the board to attach it? What the French do is lace the cords through the boards to secure them. Here, let’s see what Paul Kersten wrote in his Exaktem Bucheinband: “It is commonly believed that a book in which the boards are attached in the French manner is more durable than one in which the German method is used. This is false. The boards are attached to the text block via the cords, and in all cases the failure was at the hinge and after many years of use, not because the boards were not laced on…” (Note: Kersten, Paul. Der Exakte Bucheinband. Halle (Saale): W. Knapp, 1923. Pages 22-23.)

BIBLIOPHILE: Again, I can’t argue with knowledge and experience of a true craftsman like you.